Get on a Plane

Several months ago I was talking to a successful, serial entrepreneur. He had sold several companies and hadn’t had to work for many years. Even still, he loved creating companies and so was at it again with his next startup. After talking for a while, the topic of travel and sales meetings came up. Naturally, he…

Lessons Learned from Failed Startups

Autopsy.io is a new site that aggregates info on failed startups. As an entrepreneur, some of my most important lessons learned came from failures. Take the eCrowds post mortem – poor customer discovery, mismatched on-boarding costs relative to monthly pricing, and slow application speed – now it’s included in Autopsy, and more accessible to entrepreneurs. Here are…

Economics of a Startup Studio

Continuing with yesterday’s post on High Alpha Studio and Seed, let’s look at the hypothetical economics of a B2B Software-as-a-Service startup studio. Assuming $20 million to be spent over five years to build 20 startups, here’s what it might look like: $4 million per year budget Expenses $3 million/year for 20 full-time employees plus four partners,…

High Alpha Studio and Seed

Earlier today, Scott Dorsey, the former CEO of ExactTarget, and a great team of entrepreneurs, launched High Alpha Studio and High Alpha Seed (see Dorsey, Gravity investors raise $35M to Launch High Alpha) in Indianapolis, Indiana. The idea is a startup studio focused on building business-to-business (B2B) Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) applications combined with a separate seed…

Use a Daily Process to Achieve Goals

When talking about goal setting, there’s often a focus on SMART goals, or general, big-picture goals. One strategy I like is based on goals driven by a daily process. The idea is to distill certain goals down to a daily activity, instead of shooting for something larger that seems more difficult to attain. Here are…

Transparency in a Startup

One of the items entrepreneurs frequently debate is the level of transparency to provide within their startup. How much information does a team member need to know? When does not enough information cause problems? While there’s no perfect answer, I’ve found that it’s better to err on the side of providing more information than expected. Here are a…