Disrespecting a Team Member is Never Acceptable

I was two years in as a full-time entrepreneur and we were meeting a potential customer in a small nondescript building less than a mile from our office. Our startup was still struggling and I, as an eager first-time entrepreneur, was chasing any opportunity regardless of fit. Helping me that day at our sales meeting was our lead engineer, and after a few pleasantries, we started talking shop with the prospect.

Quickly, as the conversation turned technical regarding product capabilities, our lead engineer dove in regaling all the details. Only I, as a sales-oriented entrepreneur, thought our lead engineer was focused too much on the minutia and not enough on tying the functionality back to the customer’s needs. So, in an expression of poor leadership, I interrupted him mid sentence and took the conversation a different direction.

Another topic with the prospect, another detailed comment from our engineer, another poor interruption from me going a different direction — on and on it repeated.

Only after the meeting, as we got into the car, the lead engineer shared with me how little he felt. How I had unprofessionally talked over him. How poorly I had reflected our company in front of the prospect. How miserable I was in the setting.

It was all true.

Now, 16 years later, I still remember this lesson. I did an unacceptable job setting expectations with the lead engineer before the meeting. I did an unacceptable job showing respect to the lead engineer in the meeting. I did not lead, I trampled.

Disrespecting a team member is never acceptable.

The next time you have the urge to talk over someone, let them finish. Hear them out. Reflect on their position. Treat them with respect — it’s always the right thing to do.

One thought on “Disrespecting a Team Member is Never Acceptable

  1. This I s good advice in all conversations being we learn more from listening than we do from talking. Upon a persons competition of their statements or answers, you always have the option, and now the time, to pose a question bring outcomes desirable to your goals before entering the meeting. Now everyone feels their contribution was valued.

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