Benchmarking Sales Development Reps

After talking to a number of entrepreneurs that are getting value out of their sales development rep (SDR) team (especially when using SalesLoft Cadence), a common question comes up: what are some SDR benchmarks? Entrepreneurs want to know where they are in relation to average, and areas to improve.

Here are a few questions to benchmark the sales development reps:

  • What’s the average number of successes (demos, appointments, meetings, etc.) per rep per month?
  • What’s the ratio of demos/appointments scheduled to completed (e.g. how many people don’t show up)?
  • What’s the average number of calls per day?
  • What’s the average ratio of calls to connects (calls that result in talking to someone)?
  • What’s the average ratio of positive conversations to calls?
  • What’s the average ratio of voicemails left to calls?
  • What’s the average number of emails per day?
  • What’s the average ratio of email opens to emails sent?
  • What’s the average ratio of email clicks to emails sent?
  • What’s the average ratio of email replies to emails sent?

While I don’t have the benchmarks (yet), I’m sure we’ll be seeing them soon. Look for more data to emerge as the sales engagement industry grows.

What else? What are some more questions to ask around benchmarking sales development reps?

2 thoughts on “Benchmarking Sales Development Reps

  1. David — another great post. For anyone who reads this and is interested, I’m willing to share our SDR stats/benchmarks. We have data on many of the bullets if they would be helpful or of interest to you.

  2. @David R – I would be interested in those stats!

    @David C – I would be interested in the number of successes broken down between emails and calls, as well as average number of contact events per success.

    Some of the ratios can be misleading for benchmarks IMO. The more time you spend personalizing your calls/emails and targeting your audience, the more success you will have. But the less people you will be able to contact.

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